Current Articles

Dressage Outside the Box - Anne Councill

Buying Sleighs: One Collector's Experience - Pictures - Jaye-Allison Winkel with Greg Cuffey

Buying Sleighs: One Collector's Experience - Jaye-Allison Winkel with Greg Cuffey

Shoeing for Winter Driving - Lyle Petersen

Various Bits and Their Effects - Heike Bean

Turnout Review with John Greenall #4 - John Greenall

Turnout Review with John Greenall #3 - John Greenall

Turnout Review with John Greenall #2 - John Greenall

Turnout Review with John Greenall #1 - John Greenall

FAQs for New Drivers: Buying & Caring for Harness - Robyn Cuffey and Jaye-Allison Winkel

A Visit with Driver Tracey Higgins - Dale Leatherman

Some Thoughts on Accidents at Horse Events - Kurt Schneider

Harnessing the Single Horse Safely and Comfortably Part 1 - Bill Morong

Harnessing the Single Horse Safely and Comfortably Part 2 - Bill Morong

Harnessing the Single Horse Safely and Comfortably Part 3 - Bill Morong

Harnessing the Single Horse Safely and Comfortably Part 4 - Bill Morong

Harnessing the Single Horse Safely and Comfortably Part 5 - Bill Morong

Preparing for Long Distance Drives - Barb Lee

Bumper Pull Trailer Jack Maintenance - Nori Lamphere

Driving at Parades - Dennis Lane and Mary Beth Cillo

Arena Driving Trials - Bob Fetters

Driving Aprons - Kristen Breyer

Horse Driving Trials - Dorothy Billington

Carriage Driving Competition Guidelines Part 2 - Dorothy Billington

Carriage Driving Competition Guidelines Part 1 - Dorothy Billington

NEDA Drives me Wild! - Cliff Lewis

All Ages Enjoy Happ's Plowing Competition - Maureen Harkcom

Introducing Tom Simmons: Carriage Driving Trainer and Breeder - Nancy Rojo

Draft Horses and Ponies at Work - Maureen Harkcom

On the Road.......Again! - Robyn Cuffey

Olaf Nyby Teaches Carriage Driving in America - Susan Andrews

First Indoor Arena Driving Event Held in Vermont - Vivian Creigh

Brandywine Driving Trial April 7th, 2001 - Bob Fetters

West Nile Virus Update, October 2000 - Helen Prinold

Let It Snow! - Lisa Cenis

Beware! Schooling Show! - Linda Fairbanks Come Drive With Us!
Advertise here!
Add Your Event!
Services
About CDnet
Contact us!
Join E-mail List
Privacy

Member Login:


Carriage Driving Competition Guidelines
by Dorothy A. Billington

The Classes of Pleasure Driving Shows: Part Two Reinsmanship and Turnout

General

The outward appearance of the American Driving Society approved Pleasure Driving Classes "Reinsmanship" and "Turnout" are very similar to the "Working" class that was described in the last issue, (http://www.carriagedriving.net/archives/billington.html). The differences lie in the judging criteria for each class.

In the "Working" class the judging criteria is: 70% on performance, manners and way of going of the horses; 20% on the condition and fit of harness and vehicle and 10% on neatness of attire.

The "Reinsmanship" judging criteria is: 75% on handling of reins and whip, control, posture and overall appearance of driver and 25% on the condition of harness and vehicle and neatness of attire.

The "Turnout" judging criteria is: 40% on performance, manners and way of going, 30% on condition, fit and appropriateness of harness and vehicle, 15% on neatness and appropriateness of harness and vehicle, and 15% on overall impression.

As in all classes at an ADS approved Pleasure Driving Show, the driver must wear a hat, gloves, and apron and carry a whip in hand under penalty of elimination. Attire should be conservative in design and appropriate to the vehicle driven; i.e., formal attire with formal vehicles, country attire with country vehicles. Horses should also conform to the vehicle type; i.e., it would be expected to see a more flashy horse with a more formal vehicle and a more ground covering horse with a country vehicle.

"Reinsmanship"

Where the "Working" class places the emphasis on the horse; the "Reinsmanship" class places the emphasis on the driver. The horse, however, must still be able to produce all of the required gaits; which is actually an indication of the driver's ability to get the horse to produce these gaits. At the judge's discretion, there may or may not be an individual test, following the line-up. These tests are usually very simple and should not cause the competitor to be overly concerned about having to perform a "test".

The competitor should enter the ring with confidence, at a working trot and in a counter clockwise direction. When all the competitors are in the ring, the judge will declare the class complete and the gate will be closed. The judge will be looking for the driver to be sitting in an upright position, with arms relaxed and at the sides, and with feet firmly on the floor; very similar to one sitting in a kitchen chair. The elbows should be bent and relaxed. The hands should have soft contact with the horse's mouth at all times. The whip, which may be carried in either hand, should be within the frame of the carriage, near the horse and not sticking out to the side where it would be rendered useless. (The wheels on the sides, the front of the horse and the rear of the carriage define the frame of the carriage.) Subtle movements of the hands and whip, along with verbal instructions, give direction to the horse. During the course of the class, the judge will ask for a Walk, Slow Trot, Working Trot and Strong Trot (or Trot On). (For definitions of these gaits, refer to the above mentioned previous issue.) These gaits will not be asked for in any particular order, but at the discretion of the judge. Drivers must be able to reinback their horses. This will be asked for after the line-up towards the end of the class, where the judge will closely inspect the turnouts and the drivers will be asked to reinback.

Should the judge decide to have the competitors perform individual tests, the class will usually be line-up at one end of the ring instead of in the center. Either all or some of the competitors may be chosen for individual tests (or "workouts"). These test are relatively simple and usually consist of the competitor driving down one side of the ring to the far end; driving some sort of figure, usually a circle or a figure of eight; perhaps with a halt and salute; then returning to the line-up. It is important to remember that a "figure of eight" is actually two round circles connected in the center. Pay close attention to the instructions for the test and do not merely drive whatever the competitor ahead of you drove as that test may contain an error.

Drive your test with confidence and show your horse to the best of your ability. This is your chance to show the judge how well you can drive your horse while his eyes are only on you!

"Turnout"

Where the "Working" class emphasizes the performance of the horse, and the "Reinsmanship" class emphasizes the performance of the driver; the "Turnout" class emphasizes the performance of the horse and the way he is "turned out". The judge will be paying much closer attention the fit of the harness and vehicle, the cleanliness of the entire turnout; (i.e., horse, vehicle, harness and driver), and the suitability of the horse for the particular vehicle, along with the horse's ability to perform the required gaits. As mentioned before, the more formal horses should be with formal vehicles and the more ground covering horses with the country type or less formal vehicles. The judge will want to see drivers, passengers and grooms in formal vehicles, formally dressed and does not want to see formal attire (or formal harness) with country vehicles.

The harness should be well fitted to the horse and sparkling clean, with leather and all metals polished. The vehicle, also well polished, should not only conform to the type of horse but should also be correctly fitted to the horse. The shafts should be at the proper height and the horse should neither be cramped nor swimming in the shafts. Harness straps should not be buckled in the very end holes, but closer to the center hole allowing for future adjustment should it be required. Colors should be coordinated with the vehicle and the horse and kept to a minimum, used only for accent and not overwhelming by themselves. The entire turnout should present itself as a picture; pleasing to the eye and all blending well together.

The competitors enter and proceed around the ring in the same fashion as the two previous classes. The same gaits will be requested, however, there will probably be no halt on the rail and no individual test. The line-up at the end of the class should be in the center of the ring where the judge will closely inspect each turnout. Remember 60% of your score is how you look, so make your turnout fit and shine!

American Driving Society

It is recommended that serious competitors consider joining the American Driving Society, P.O. Box 160, Metamora, MI 48455. Membership in this organization provides competitors with the ADS Handbook; the complete rules and regulations for all ADS sanctioned competitions. Pleasure Driving competitors should read and be familiar with all the blue and green pages in this Handbook.

Written by Dorothy A. Billington dotbillington@earthlink.net 2/01

Next issue: "Drive and Ride" and "Combination Hunter"



Warning: include(footer.htm) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/headelf/public_html/cdnet/index.php on line 529

Warning: include(footer.htm) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/headelf/public_html/cdnet/index.php on line 529

Warning: include(footer.htm) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home/headelf/public_html/cdnet/index.php on line 529

Warning: include() [function.include]: Failed opening 'footer.htm' for inclusion (include_path='.:/opt/php52/lib/php') in /home/headelf/public_html/cdnet/index.php on line 529